Better than you think A list of the hidden perks of the surgical clerkship rotation

Posted on 09 June 2014 by Jimmy Yan (Meds 2015)

Exhaustion from call; PTSD from getting barked at; loss of a social life. For many medical students, the surgical rotation during clerkship is supposedly the “doom and gloom” block. While it is a challenging block with a lot to learn, that is not a phenomenom unique from the other specialty rotations either. In fact, there are a lot of misconceptions on how “brutal” the rotation will be. As someone who is just finishing their 12 weeks in it, my personal testimony* (note: am interested in doing a surgical residency) is that it is not as frightful as many make it. There are in fact quite a few hidden gems about the surgical block that I am really going to miss.

1) Wearing Greens to work. – Sure you might miss out on being able to choose your outfit for the day, but think of all the time that saves as well! Over the past 3 months, I’ve greatly cut down the cost of my laundry (both time and money for supplies) and also get to the enjoy what is essentially pajamas to work. There aren’t many fields of work that let you do that, aside from maybe mattress testers and these guys.

2) Premium Parking – Okay, okay, okay. I can’t really personally attest to this because I’m still cycling my commute to the hospitals, but word on the street from other clerks and my roommate who just finished a few months on general surgery as part of his residency electives is that when you come in at 6am or earlier, you get the best parking in the house. Guaranteed. This makes getting out when you do get to leave all the easier. Also in the winter days this shortens the walk from your car to being inside with the warmth. That definitely makes a big difference.

3) Less road rage, aka less traffic – I don’t think I’ve been in a city with more infuriating traffic lights and less efficient roads than London. Even in some cities in China which have populations the size of Ontario on the road at least there is movement and is programmed to accommodate the flow of traffic. London’s traffic doesn’t make any sense, which is baffling considering how short distances one has to cover to span the city. Particularly in the normal peak “rush hours” the pace crawls by – I am definitely able to move quicker on my bike during these jams. Yet if you arrive early and leave late, you never have to deal with the extra strength Advil requiring headache that is London traffic. Picture it: leisurely arriving to work, air is still clean because you aren’t breathing in idling exhaust fumes, able to actually hear the birds sing in the morning as you go about your way, and smoothly getting to the hospital from home. No fuss, no muss. It’s almost kind of nice, right?

4) Getting to enjoy the sunrise each morning – Lost in the frenzy of the hospital and the pace of clerkship are those moments to just step back and be in the moment. Yes, we’re up at an hour the night owls are just going to bed at. Yes, we have to round on patients so quickly sometimes I get my cardio for the day just through that. But even if it’s just for a few seconds through a window in a patient’s room each morning, getting to see those first rays of a new day break over the horizon is just so moving. Getting to see the sunrise helps charge up my batteries in preparation for the long day ahead.

5) A lot of complimentary coffee – And this has nothing to do with the fact that I was on surgery during Tim Horton’s Roll Up the Rim contest. But the residents/attendings seemed always willing to buy the clerks a coffee when there was a moment’s of downtime between cases. As a person who enjoys a good cup of the black stuff, this was a very nice touch. Stick taps to that. Yes, some would say that if we had longer hours to sleep we wouldn’t need the coffee during the day, but I just like to drink coffee.  Even if it’s Timmies. 

6) No trouble sleeping at night – My brain is a troll at night. Previously, if I’d try to sleep my mind would keep me up overthinking about things that happened during the previous day, trying to figure out stuff I should be prepared for the next, or just generally screwing around with random streams of consciousness. While on surgery, when I want to sleep I just do the flop. I might have gone to bed earlier before, but I’m actually getting more sleep now.

Detractors might argue that this is simply Stockholme Syndrome reasoning but I feel that there are many overlooked moments to enjoy in the surgery rotation. There’s great teaching, a lot to do, and the feeling of being included in the team while on the rotation, but those are the obvious ones. The above list tries to address some of the hidden, little things that generally go by everyday without appreciation. But really, it’s often these little things that add up and make a difference in the end.

 

Comments are closed.