The Pioneering:

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) was a pioneer of Western classical music. Though many see his music as primitive, considering the slew of artistic and political restrictions placed on musicians during his day it was actually extremely innovative. It is true that many draconian rules of harmony and composition were developed based on Bach’s works. However,

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The Innocent:

One of the most obvious trends in the evolution of classical music (and perhaps the entire history of music in general) was the movement from the complex to the simple, from the courtly to the everyday. Perhaps nowhere was such progression more conspicuous than in opera. As a form of musical theatre, opera is like

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The Graceful:

One of the most graceful musical forms to ever exist in the history of music is the music of the Gypsies. 19th century Romantic composers were greatly fascinated by it. But what is it about Gypsy music that makes it so graceful? Perhaps it is a reflection of their wandering and carefree lifestyle. Minimally constrained

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The Ceaseless:

Both the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems seem to revolve around the essence of motion. The heart never ceases to beat, and our muscles and bones are always occupied with some kind of movement, no matter how minor. Indeed, for the most part we live our lives without even noticing such constant involvement of these two

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Microcosm #2 – Revolution

In this post, a revolution is underway in a dark, dystopian state. But will you root for the underdog, despite being who you are? In any revolution, it is the idea that matters. Not the one with the idea, but the idea itself. Our idea has been changing, passed down from generation to generation, accumulating

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Welcome to Microcosm

Welcome to Microcosm, where we bring biological concepts to life! I never thought that I would be the one. When I met her for the first time, that nanosecond, I thought of the mantra taught to us in training camp. To use that intensely personal weapon, unique to each of us, against a future enemy who would challenge

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The Longing:

The unique style of French composer Claude Debussy (1862-1918) made him one of the few composers who really stood out. In fact, most would credit Debussy with founding an entire era of music. While studying at the Conservatoire de Paris, Debussy shocked his music theory professors with harmonic writing that defied long-valued traditions established since

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The Passionate:

The orchestral writing of Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849), all of which set in the context of a composition for piano and orchestra, has often been criticized as “lacking”. Opponents attack his style of directing most of the spotlight at the piano while the orchestra serves as a “mere background”. But such radical departure from convention is

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The Haunting:

The image chosen for this essay is a black-and-white reproduction of Arnold Böcklin’s 1880-1886 painting Isle of the Dead. Böcklin was a Romantic Symbolist painter whose works often portrayed the grotesque and the fantastical, and the Isle of the Dead was an epitome of such style. This painting was the source of inspiration for Sergei

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